Clinton veterans scramble to save the gangster-state they built

Seeking to salvage a two decade-old legacy that advances no American national interests, advocates of the mess called Kosovo are using distractions from the pandemic to prevent the Trump Administration from changing course.

Here are excerpts from my story in the April 22 Washington Times:

Like a political cult’s fantasy park, a 10-foot statue of a waving Bill Clinton leers over Bill Clinton Boulevard not far from the Hillary clothing boutique. A metal bust of President Clinton’s former secretary of state, Madeleine Albright, lurks in the park nearby. Out of town, near an American military base, a 20-mile stretch of road is named after Joe Biden’s late son. A congressman from the Bronx, Eliot Engel, not only got his own boulevard but earned his face on a postage stamp.

It sounds like a freak show for The Swamp, and it’s real. All made possible with $2 billion of the American taxpayers’ money. Add an extra big bill for American troops there — not to protect the place from foreign invaders or to secure American vital interests — but to keep the locals from killing one another. The freak show is called Kosovo.

Kosovo is a never-ending mess. Its own people, a mishmash of irreconcilable cultures, historically can’t get along without some form of dictator or military occupation. Each side ethnically “cleanses” itself of the other in a civil war horror between ethnic Albanian Muslims and ethnic Serbian Christians. The Albanian majority forced out most of the Christians — hardly anyone in the world cared — and declared independence from Serbia.

The breakaway landlocked province has zero strategic value to the United States. Less than half the area of Vermont, Kosovo is home to a population almost the size of the Bronx. It’s a babel of five official languages with two alphabets. Eighty percent of its young people don’t work. Kosovo’s most famous exports are jihadists.

Link to complete article here in the Washington Times.

About J Michael Waller

J Michael Waller is a Senior Analyst for Strategy at the Center for Security Policy. He was a founding editorial board member of NATO’s Defence Strategic Communications journal, and for 13 years held the Walter and Leonore Annenberg Chair as a professor at the Institute of World Politics. He holds a PhD in international security affairs from Boston University. Click here for full bio.